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Old 08-30-2000, 07:59 AM
Anonymous
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Default Propagation of manzanita and ceanothus

Hi all. I was hoping someone could help me out. I've tried severaltimes to take cuttings of A. edmunsii and C. wheelerii sorry if misspelledand have had no luck. For each I've tried 4 inch stem tip nodalcuttings in a 50/50 mixture of peat and vermiculite with rootone and placedthem in a mini greenhouse under grow lights. My most recent attemptstarted 6 weeks ago but as usual the cuttings rotted.

Any information on what I'm doing wrong or how to improve my technique would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Jeff</p>
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Old 09-06-2000, 12:14 AM
Anonymous
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Default Re: Propagation of manzanita and ceanothus

Jeff - I do not know about cuttings for these plants. For the ceanothus try pushing a branch over and pittung it on the ground, weight it down and cover that with soil. The Ceanothus I have in my yard was put in by the gardener and has that tendency. Like rooting from contact points with the ground. Outside of that here are two resources for working with seeds. Seed propagation of Native Californai Plants by Dara Emery, 1988 by the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. also,Collecting, Processing, and germinating Seeds of wildland plants, Young and Young, 1986 by Timber Press. Good luck in you endeavors. Ben</p>
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Old 09-17-2000, 02:03 PM
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Default Re: Propagation of manzanita and ceanothus

Sorry about replying so late to this message - hope you are still watching this site!

When I worked at Yerba Buena Nursery, we did all our cuttings in a mix of perlite and vermiculite. I think the ratio was 8 parts perlite to 2 parts vermiculite. Peat tends to hold moisture and makes cuttings rot!

The right rooting medium and conditions may be more important than the rooting hormone. I have rooted Ceanothus cuttings with mere Rootone, so a strong IBA solution is not always necessary or desirable.

Manzanitas are more difficult, and may warrant a stronger hormone solution. Both shrubs should root well in the fall, after the hot, dry weather has passed. Another thing about native shrub cuttings is that people often over-water or over mist them. If possible, wate the cutting flat so that just the cutting medium gets wet. Continual water on the leaves of the cuttings can rot them. This is especially true of manzanitas, which are highly susceptible to fugal pathogens.

A bit of peat in the potting soil, once the cuttings have rooted, is a good idea, as long as you don't overdo it. The acidity conferred by the peat is good for manzanitas, but remember, in the wild, the acidity in their native soil is mineral in origin, rather than organic. Also, too much peat in either the cutting flat or potting soil can attract fungus gnats, whose tiny larvae will eat the roots of cuttings and young plants.

So, try the cuttings again in the fall, and good luck!

Lori</p>
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Old 10-18-2000, 07:05 AM
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Default Re: Propagation of manzanita and ceanothus

For manzanita, the layering technique works well. You make a small slanted cut in a branch, dig a hole by the plant where you can bend the branch over, plant it a few inches deep where the cut is. You can place a small pebble in the cut and peg it down with a garden staple, too. Cover the hole, water well and some people say put a rock over the top. I have groundcover manzanita that is naturally layering, so I made some of these cuts and have a few plants going. They say to leave it for a season, then carefully dig up to see if you've got roots. When it has its own roots, you have your new plant. I haven't checked mine yet, but it seems pretty foolproof because the plant is still attached to its mother so it gets the nutrients while it's growing new roots. You can do this with salvia too and probably ceanothus. I started some salvia cuttings in half sharp sand builder's sand and half peat moss and they haven't died yet. About three weeks old. Good luck.</p>
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Old 01-20-2011, 10:11 PM
jbarber jbarber is offline
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Default I did it...I think

I took two manzanita cuttings and planted them in separate pots. Both pots were filled with topsoil and sand mixture. One pot I put 16-16-16 fertilizer (just a bit) and the other I put none. This was 3 months ago. I left them both outside in the elements where it has gotten down to 20 degrees Fahrenheit. The plant with fertilizer is still alive and well and the other one died within a week. Also the plant that lived was cut from 1 years growth where the other was a two years growth point.
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