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  #11  
Old 06-02-2000, 04:51 AM
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Default Re: Can native trees cover telephone wires in Santa Monica??

Laura - We have one oak in our front yard. It was planted as part of the landscape design for the housing area. It used to be on a drip type irrigation system, but we removed it for the sake of the tree. Oaks do not like to be watered. It makes them suceptible to root rot and other fungal attacks. Our has survived a fungal and insect invasion in its early years and has grown about ten feet in the past five years. Oaks will do ok in a watered lawn setting but it is not optimal for them. If they can only be planted where water will be applied daily then the water should not extend much into their drip line. The drip line is the vertically projected edge of the canopy if the sun is shinging directly over the tree. Keep in mind that an oak 'can' reach thirty or more feet across the canopy at full maturity depending on the species. Black and Blue oaks are great for spreading canopies. So, in answer to your question about distance between them. I would probably say either on on the middle of the area you want to hide wires in or divide your area in thirds and plant one at each third marker or as necessary depending on your ard size. Talk atcha, Ben</p>
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  #12  
Old 06-09-2000, 02:01 PM
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Default Re: Can native trees cover telephone wires in Santa Monica??

hi ben- the search continues, but I am nearing a final decision. with many thanks to you for your ongoing assistance in this project. I have another project now too, check out the 'upland' post. But getting back to my backyard--If I keep the irrigation away from the oak, can any colorful native plants grow underneath their canopies and/or native grasses? If oaks are better without anything growing underneath, I may move an oak to the more hardscaped area in front of my house. thanks for any more help. laura</p>
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  #13  
Old 06-10-2000, 05:27 AM
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Default Re: Can native trees cover telephone wires in Santa Monica??

Laura -In Yosemite Valley, deer grassMuhlenbergia rigens does well in the compnay of oaks. It is a very nice grass. It is also fairly drought resistant but I do not know if it is native to your area. As for other plants, I am not really sure. Check the local library for books about Native peoples of your area. Those references may give you more ideas about what might go with your oaks and what you might like to see in your yard. Ben</p>
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  #14  
Old 06-15-2000, 07:08 AM
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Default Re: Can native trees cover telephone wires in Santa Monica??

It is often recommended that very local natives be used whenever possible. When looking for trees for your Santa Monica yard, you might look at trees with parentage from the Santa Monica Mountains and the Los Angeles basin and hills. Oaks from further inland would probably not appreciate Santa Monica's coastal influence. This would limit the number of Oaks under consideration to Quercus agrifolia coast live oak, Quercus lobata valley oak, and perhaps Q. chrysolepis canyon live oak. Q. wislizenii is also local but shrub and tree forms and I am not sure you could verify from nursery stock, if available, what to expect in the mature tree. The three tree oaks would get quite large and would require the dedication of your entire yard to the requirements of native oaks oakleaf mulch and a few carefully chosen plants in the outer areas of the dripline, planted before the trees roots are growing there. It would also likely be influenced by neighbors' yards heavy watering uphill could result in problems. Since there should be little or no supplemental watering not only to the drip line but for several feet beyond the drip line, the area of control desirable is really at least 40' by 40'.

There are a few other trees that you might consider. The most attractive, white Alder Alnus rhombifolia and Fremont cottonwood Populus fremontii are riparian and would need some summer watering. Their roots, however, might seek out water in underground pipes and cause problems. Often backyards don't have pipes and in that case it should not be a problem. They are fast growing and more upright and a wonderful variety of natives could be planted under them. Male cottonwoods are sometimes chosen for landscapes because they do not distribute the 'cottony' seeds that the females do. Sycamores Platanus racemosa, bay bay laurel, Oregon myrtle Umbellularia californica and the native holly leafed cherry Prunus ilicifolia are less demanding of water yet adaptable to lawn or typical landscaping situations, although the bay's leaf litter may discourage lawn growth and there would be bay nuts and/or cherry pits. These are trees that grow in riparian valleys but are also found considerably further from the actual stream, especially the bay and cherry. All of these trees get tall enough to cause problems if planted under the wires so plant them far enough in front of the wires to avoid the need for drastic pruning. Another tree that will grow in these situations but also on dry slopes is the toyon Heteromeles arbutifolia, a shrub or an attractive multi-trunked small tree.

One of the rarest plant communities in the world is the oak-walnut woodland. A few stands of this community remain in the hills of the greater metropolitan Los Angeles. It would be worth considering planting a locally native California walnut Juglans californica. It is a small multitrunked tree that can be kept to one or a few trunks by pruning new suckers as they appear mostly in spring. The California walnut would grow well with the toyon, in dry or moist areas.

Actually, Catalina ironwood Lyonothamnus floribundus asplenifolius of the nursery trade does not occur on Santa Catalina Island, it occurs on Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Clemente Islands. It might be more accurate to refer to this tree as fernleaf ironwood. There is an ironwood that occurs only on Santa Catalina but it is Lyonothamnus floribundus. The fernleaf ironwood is the most attractive of the two and is quite successful in coastal Southern California. Although it is not a 'local' native, it is not a genetic problem locally because there are no local ironwoods that it could pollinate.

I would suspect that bamboos are similar to the Giant Reed grass Arundo donax that displaces so much vegetation in our Southern California rivers. Since it is from another continent and it has not brought with it its native insects, it is relatively free of insects not being appealing to our local insects and therefore provides little food for our local birds. The native willow that it displaces has 100 times the insect population and it has horizontal branches where birds can rest and build nests. One of the pleasures of gardening with natives is bringing the natural to your home, attracting birds and butterflies. </p>
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  #15  
Old 06-22-2000, 04:59 PM
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Default Re: Can native trees cover telephone wires in Santa Monica??

thanks so much for your detailed response!What about the Fremont Cottonwood? I've heard not to plant cottonwoods because they are not hardy and weak wooded trees? Also, how long would it take the umbellularia californica to reach 30ft do you think? I like this tree because it's an evergreen.Any other evergreen suggestions?

</p>
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  #16  
Old 07-20-2000, 12:30 PM
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Default Re: Can native trees cover telephone wires in Santa Monica??

Fremont Cottonwoods can grow in all but the coldest high mountain and desertareas of California. In milder areas they may even be evergreen or only brieflydeciduous. The branches are thin but the leaves are light and thin and havelong, flexible petioles. This allows the wind to pass through without muchstress on the branches. Black Cottonwoods, however, do have a reputation ofhaving weak, brittle branches. As far as the Bay Tree goes, it probably grows ata rate of about one foot per year, depending on cultural conditions. Otherevergreen trees you might consider for Southern California: Toyon Heteromelesarbutifolia, Holly leaf Cherry Prunus ilicifolia, Mountain Mahogany Cercocarpusbetuloides, Fernleaf 'Catalina' Ironwood Lyonothamnus floribundusasplenifolius</p>
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  #17  
Old 03-09-2001, 08:56 AM
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Default Re: Can native trees cover telephone wires in Santa Monica??

Laura: if you have not found any plants for underneath your oak yet, check out the 'canative' website for a listing of nearly every plant tree shrub, flower,grass etc. native to CA. The site provides a photo, and infor re sun and water needs, region of CA to which each plant is native, dimensions, etc. </p>
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  #18  
Old 06-12-2002, 05:00 AM
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Default Re: Can native trees cover telephone wires in Santa Monica??

catalina ironwood is perfect for the pole. the fern leafed one. ours went from 4' to 12' in 2 years and is a thing of beauty. tree of life nursery in san juan capo carrys it.</p>
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