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View Full Version : Sutera diffusa, is it invasive?


Anonymous
06-17-2004, 04:17 PM
From: fun38oakland@yahoo.com
Date: 06/14/02
Time: 12:18 PM


A local nursery is selling this ground cover and I'm a bit confused. Bacopa, it's common name, is also used for a group of plants that appear on a list of invasive plants in Florida waterways. Sutera diffusa was listed on the Kew Gardens web site as an example of a name with no scientific meaning which should actually be called Sutera cordata. All in all, I'm trying to figure out if this plant would be detremental to the environment if I put it in my garden in Berkeley. And while I'm asking... any suggestions on low growing plants, 4 inches or under, drought tolerant that can take DIRECT sun, hopefully native and beneficial for bugs? So far my list consists of creeping rosemary, a 4inch yarrow with yellow flowers - Achillea "notmillifolia", sea-pink, creeping thyme- wooly and lime. Nary a native in the bunch!

Thanks.

Laurie

Anonymous
06-17-2004, 04:18 PM
From: frdandrs@yahoo.com
Date: 06/25/02
Time: 07:05 PM


native california strawberry sounds like your best bet. I forget the latin name.

Anonymous
06-17-2004, 04:18 PM
From: fred andres frdandrs@yahoo.com
Date: 06/25/02
Time: 07:10 PM


Your correct about the yarrow achilles millefolia. The yellow cultivar is probably not native. But don't rip it out-- it's a great butterfly and bee plant. Achilles millefolia can make a good ground cover in the right situation. I suggest going over to Native Here Nursery off of Golf Course Drive in Tilden Park. They're open Friday and Saturdays 10 to noon or so. Great place to find natives and native plant advice including plant right from your area in Berkeley!