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Anonymous
08-22-2003, 06:20 PM
Does anyone have any experience with or know the best way to remove non-native blackberry bushes from the slope of a bank above a stream. There are erosional factors that prohibit the digging up and removal of the black berry roots. On the other hand there is concern about using an herbacide within a fairly close proximity of a stream. Thanks for any input on this subject.</p>



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Anonymous
08-25-2003, 01:29 PM
Where is your creek? What are the potential erosion problems, as you see it? Is the bank currently eroding during rainstorms? Has there been recently, or will there be major development in the watershed of the creek? If so, that could be a major erosion factor, much greater than changing the vegetation. Eventually the creek will reach an equilibrium, but the path to that equilibrium is difficult, if not impossible to stop or reverse. If the neighborhood is established, then it is much easier to restore the bank - you probably won`t see all your efforts washed downstream somewhere! After you dig out the blackberry, you can probably put in live stakes and fascimes, using willow for sunny areas right by the creek, and ninebark, dogwood, and elderberry for shaded areas. It is not quite the time of the year to do live stakes, however. Ann L. Riley has a basic to moderately technical book on stream restoration called, 'Restoring Streams in Cities : A Guide for Planners, Policymakers, and Citizens.' The book describes wood staking and fascimes, and praises the restoration benefits of native plants. A caveat, however is that although it is often beneficial to 'slow the flow' and stabilize an eroding bank using willow stakes, often it is not, considering that many of our homes are built on the flood plain - or lower! If flooding is already an issue, it may be best to stake nine-bark and elderberry further up the bank early in the rainy season, and plant 'softer' plants like monkey flowers, sedges, etc. between 1 inch and 18 inches vertically above the dry weather flow line. Then again, slowing the flow and allowing the creek to rise a little bit may alliviate flooding downstream! It may be wise to consult a local stream restoration expert, if in doubt.</p>



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Anonymous
08-26-2003, 04:26 AM
P.S. - To play it safe, you may consider replacing the non-native blackberry with a similar native plant. Native blackberry is an obvious choice, but currants, such as Pink Flowering Currant will give you the mass that Non-native blackberries do, though less vine-like. Also consider vine like varieties of Wild Rose. All of the natives described tend to grow quickly and take over. Trees above can provide shade that non-native blackberries cannot tolerate. Consider rooting out tree cuttings in containers first for better survival rates. I am not a native expert, but I have observed or participated in many creek restoration projects in the East Bay.</p>



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Anonymous
08-28-2003, 02:53 PM
You can paint the fresh cut canes immediately with roundup and that should almost completely eliminate runoff problems. It works pretty well.</p>